Nisolo Shoes: a Little Kinder to the Planet

It’s December! The final stretch of the crazy year of 2020, though I am not holding out hope for the beginning of 2021…

We’re now officially in the holiday season. I have a fake palm in my living room that is covered in lights. I decided that instead of buying a small fake tree, that I would just turn my palm into a tropical Christmas tree. I have small little ornaments and even a tiny tree skirt. Its pretty cute if I do say so, and it is a little better for the environment. I used things I already had, only buying when it was necessary.

Speaking of the holiday season, Thanksgiving looked a little different this year. Like I said, I spent this year away from my immediate family like a lot of people did. But I did get to spend it with my little covid bubble which helped make a sour situation very sweet.

We spent the afternoon chatting, drinking, eating, and enjoying each others company. I hadn’t been around anyone besides my cat for about a week and a half. It was fantastic to have conversations that were not answered with a meow or a tail flap. I also got to eat the most fantastic crab cakes.

Another highlight of the day was debuting my fantastic new Nisolo shoes.

Aren’t they stunning??

It is Emma D’Orsay Oxford in Brandy. I adore the side slits and nodes to French Fashion. While I would traditionally classify these as a dress shoe, back in my I-know-nothing-about-fashion-days (which I am just now growing out of), these are so incredibly versatile. Here I am wearing them with jeans, but I just as soon wear them with my plaid slacks, a skirt, or even a pair of shorts.

These shoes are beautifully made and incredibly high quality. They are a little tight fitting at first, but the shoe soon forms to your foot.

Photo Curtsey of Nisolo

When picking products to feature I try only to pick brands that produce sustainable products but do so in an ethical way.

Thats why I like Nisolo. Not only do they produce REALLY cute shoes, but they also pay their employees a living wage.

Nisolo publishes detailed information on everything they do: their factories, their wages, and their climate and social impact.

Nisolo has created 117 new sustainable jobs and their wages are 33% above fair trade wages. All of their employees are over the age of 18 and they have invest $3.5 million back into the Peruvian economy. Nisolo is also B-corporation certified. “B Corp certification is similar to fair trade, but determines environmental and social impact beyond product attributes or production processes. Rather, the assessment takes a deep look into a company’s leadership, governance, suppliers, employees, communities, etc. in order to determine (and ultimately score) the social and environmental impact an organization has on all of its stakeholders.”

Nisolo’s main factory is in Peru but they also partner with independent artisans. They make it a goal to empower women and pay them fair wages as well. They help their employees establish bank accounts and savings, and employees can also have a salary advance for big expenses to save themselves from the loan sharks.

Currently, the lowest wage in their Peruvian factory is $280 a month. That is for entry level positions. While it is low in consideration of our wages, it is actually much higher than the average wage in Peru for entry level positions.

I love the transparency in this company. Yes, there are improvements to be made. There are improvements everywhere, but the fact that they allow you to see the inner operations of their supply chain and show were they have made mistakes in the past is promising.

Nisolo also combats climate change by actively protecting trees from deforestation in the Amazon Basin.

These shoes are terrific. They do good for people, for the planet, and as a self confidence booster.

(Shoes received in partnership with brightly.eco scouts program)

Tips & Tricks: A Sustainable Holiday

Listen as you read

The holiday season. It is finally upon us… but it looks a little different this year. Many of us, myself included, are separated from our families. I, for instance, am in Chicago while my family is in much warmer parts of the country. This holiday season feels different than others. I think I’ve been looking forward to it much more than I usually do too.

The time from Thanksgiving to New Years is always filled with so much hope and love. I think we all need a little bit more of that this year. I have even broke my family tradition of only listening to Christmas music post Thanksgiving. I watched Dash & Lily today on Netflix, which omg cheesy but cute teenage romance (also the Jonas Brothers are in it?? and I love Joe so…) and am writing this while listening to Christmas music and sitting next to a candle (kind of like a fireplace right?) while it is completely dark at 5 pm.

Starting to feel like the holidays.

I think I may even try to decorate my small little house this week.

I, like so many others, are not with my family this holiday to protect them and myself and others from the horrors of Coronavirus. This holiday season should really be spent looking out for others and being selfless.

Being selfless also includes putting the planet’s interests above your own. (You knew this was coming right? I gotta input my sustainable knowledge at some point…) I have complied a little list about ways that you can be sustainable this year! Whether it be through Christmas cards, gift wrap, decorations, or holiday meals.

The holiday season is a time to give back to others, a time to show them how much the mean to you, a time to be kind to strangers. Be kind to the planet too.

(As per usual, I am not being paid for recommending any of these companies, products, or ideas. I am sharing them of my own volition and belief in a commitment to a sustainable future)

Sustainable Christmas Cards:

To start off this list, I thought I would share a really cool shop that I was recently introduced to: Paper Culture.

This organization is really cool. For every purchase you make, they plant a tree.

Curtesy of Paper Culture

They’ve planted over 1 MILLION trees. Insane. They have a done of cute designs for the holiday season and beyond. This a great alternative to other Christmas card companies as it actively works to mitigate climate change.

Reduce Food Waste

Food waste is such a large problem in the developed world. And it just sky rockets around holidays. People always make more than what they will eat and often times just toss it, instead of saving it as left overs or making less food.

To make sure you don’t just end up throwing away your left overs, freeze them! They will keep a lot longer and there’s a good chance you’ll come back to it. You can also make sure you eat what you have before getting new food or ordering in. Use what you have before you get more. You can also find new recipes to repurpose your left overs.

Compost the stuff you can’t eat! Composting is such a great way to reduce food waste and give back to the Earth. I got my mom a composter for the holidays last year, and while it wasn’t quite what we needed, she ended up composting in her garden bed. You don’t need your own compost box or garden though. You can store your food scraps in the freezer, and when you are ready to get rid of them, find a local compost collection site near you!

Eat Less Meat

I think we can all agree that Turkey definitely does not live up to the hype. So why eat it?

This year, try eating less meat. Make more vegetable dishes and sides. Eating less meat is such a huge thing that you can do for the environment and to reduce climate change on an individual level.

Travel Better or Not at All

This year might be easier than others to not travel across the country with Corona and all, but emissions from planes and cars around the holidays are so detrimental to the planet.

You really shouldn’t be traveling this year ( I mean Illinois just went under another statewide stay at home order), but if you must, try keeping these ideas in mind.

Travel less often. Instead of driving or fly across country for Christmas and Thanksgiving, pick one. Or stay home every other year. This would help a lot with carbon emissions.

Take a bus or a train instead of flying. This is much less convenient, but convenient rarely means good for the planet.

You can also buy carbon offsets. This supports companies and projects that are working to reduce carbon emissions. I bought one for my mom last Christmas in fact. I funded the planting of trees, clean water initiatives, and several other projects.

Stop the Black Friday Frenzy

Black Friday is a global nightmare. We buy stuff that destroys the planet just because it’s cheap. This year, try to avoid the pull of consumer culture. Buy from sustainable brands if you must, or thrift, or make your own gifts!

You could also chose to give experience gifts. These gifts are very cool and are a great gift for a year when we didn’t get to do anything. You can buy a voucher to many places that the recipient gets to redeem when it is safe to do so. You aren’t contributing to consumer culture and are giving a fun and personal gift. Experience gifts can be anything from wine tastings, to movie tickets, to a coupon for a dinner with you!

Sustainable Gift Wrap? Yes Please!

Wrapping is known to be horrific for the planet. So, what can we do?

Repurpose old newspapers or paper shopping bags. Use plain, brown, recyclable paper instead of the glossy stuff that can’t be recycled. Decorate with twine and pine and berries. Be natural this year. Sustainability is in.

Natural Decorations

In addition to natural wrappings, try natural decorations. If you need to buy new decorations, and can’t reuse what you have from previous years (which is always the best), try being more natural.

Get a real tree, something that can be composted and returned to the earth, instead of a fake tree made from petroleum. If you must have a fake tree, make sure it is one you can use forever.

Reducing waste is incredibly important. If you use natural decorations, like real garland or a wooden reindeer, or you make your own, try to find things that can be reused, if it can’t be composted. This is will not only reduce your holiday costs, but reduce your footprint this holiday season as well.

This list is far from exhaustive, but I hope it will push you in the right direction.

Enjoy this holiday, even if you aren’t with your loved ones. Make do with what you have. Find the joy in this situation. Light your candles, dance around to whatever music you like the most, and eat as many cookies as it takes.

I, for one, am going to go spin around to Step into Christmas by my love Sir Elton John.

Happy Holidays from me and mine to you and yours, wherever you all may be this year.

Tips & Tricks: A Sustainable Closet

I am back! And this week we are going to be talking about tips for a sustainable closet.

I took a week off, not that I was very regular about posting anyways, because midterms had me swamped. But I am back, and we are going to dive right into ways to be sustainable in your closet.

You should know, I am not an expert on this. I am writing this as someone who is currently working on this herself and is trying every day to be better than I was yesterday. These are things that I have done to change my daily habits or to incorporate sustainable alternatives into my life that I know that everyone can do as well. The things that I suggest are not, by all means, exhaustive. There are a ton of alternatives out there, you just have to do your research.

On the docket for today: outfit repeating, shopping secondhand, and where to buy things when you absolutely must buy new.

Outfit repeating: what is it and why should you do it?

Our fear of outfit repeating is mainly an American thing, and it is tied to our full embrace of capitalism. There has been a call in the sustainable community to normalize outfit repeating, wearing clothes that you own more than once. It is a direct retaliation against fast fashion, which encourages a new outfit for every occasion.

Outfit repeating is sustainable. You are using what you already have and not needlessly using water and releasing carbon emissions for the sake a new outfit that someone will only see you wear once.

There has been growing popularity in the trend of capsule wardrobe. A capsule wardrobe is picking and choosing your favorite versatile clothes, remixing them and wearing them different ways. That way, you shop less often, and when you do, it is intentional. You also are more aware of what is in your closet and you have pieces that work together in different ways.

But you shouldn’t go out and buy all new clothes for your capsule wardrobe. Work with that you have, thrift what you need. If you can’t find what you need secondhand, buy it from a sustainable and ethical company that is transparent about what they do. Don’t fall for green washing.

A capsule wardrobe typically has less than 40 pieces in it, but what you have is incredibly versatile. Something to seriously consider if you are interested in being more sustainable in your closet. But remember, start with what you already own! This is not an excuse to go out and buy more clothes.

So if you do need to buy something, where do you go?

Thrifting!

Shopping second hand is the most sustainable way to shop for new clothes. Even though something has been worn before, it is still new to you. Depop is a great way to sell clothes and buy things from each other. I found adorable skort from a seller on there and I wore it all summer.

Another great place to buy online is threadUP. ThreadUp, according to their website, is the world’s largest online consignment and thrift store. Over the summer they came out with their personalized boxes, and I had the opportunity to get one (this is not paid, I promise. Not that big a blog yet). I filled out a questionnaire about sizes and style preferences, uploaded my pinterest board of style ideas and BAM! Personalized style box sent right to my door. I did return somethings, but I kept a skirt, dress, tank top, and shirt. You only pay for what you keep.

Of course they also have their traditional online shopping platform, which has more clothes than you could ever imagine. They also have all of your favorite brands. Love Anthropologie and Madewell, but hate their lack of sustainability? Thrift them. It is a sustainable way to get the brands you love.

So what happens if you can’t find what you need at a local thrift store or online? Where do you go?

I have a few recommendations, but let me also introduce you to this super cool resource. For a quick assessment of all your favorite clothing brands, check out the Good On You Directory, which rates brands on labor, environment, and animal usage. It will give you sustainable alternatives to your favorite, but earth killing, brand.

So, when you absolutely need to buy a new piece, this is a great place to find a small, sustainable business that can get you that product. Something to keep in mind, a lot of those businesses are based out of the country. So check to see if they off set their travel emissions.

Now, my favorite brands!

Again, I am not being paid for any of this, nor will I get a kick back if you follow any of these links. I am simply sharing these brands because I genuinely believe in the mission and the products of these companies and know that they are doing good for the planet.

I personally live in my yoga pants and have had terrible luck with them ripping in the crotch and being constantly covered in pet hair (remember that long haired cat I live with, there are remnants of her on every possible surface). I don’t love the idea of buying yoga pants second hand, and am okay with buying them new because I know that I will wear them until I can’t any longer. Girlfriend Collective is active wear made ethically. They have yoga pants, sport bras, track suits, sweatsuits, shorts (both run and bike!), and more.

I have the Paloma Bra, in plum, and the compressive high rise legging in black. For my short legs, I chose the 23in legging, and they don’t gather at the bottom at all, which I love. Here are some pictures of my loved pieces, both holding up incredibly well after being worn rather frequently.

Paloma Bra in Plum
Bra and Compressive legging combo, ft. miss cat

Could I have cleaned my mirror before this? Absolutely. But, we get stuck with my messy mirror. Again, I only include this because of how much I stand behind their products.

So what makes Girlfriend collective sustainable? They take plastic bottles and turn that into fabric, and they make sure to off set all the carbon used to create their products. On each product, they tell you how much water and carbon is saved by the creation of this product. I invite you to read about their sustainability here. They will also recycle their old clothes. You can ship back your pieces of theirs once you have worn them all the way through and they will recycle the fabric. How cool?

The other brand I want to dig into today is, Will’s Vegan Store. I LOVE this brand. Completely love it. They sell everything from tops, to shoes, to bags, to accessories. I have three pairs of shoes from them and love everything I have. It fits perfectly, it is all vegan, and all ethically made. They use sustainable packaging as well.

I have the deep tread Chelsea boots, NY sneakers in white (which is very on brand for me), and point toe boots.

Point toe boots and NY Sneakers in White

Other brands of worthy mention: Ocelot Market, Boyish Jeans, ABLE, Allbirds and Patagonia

I have only tried Patagonia and Allbirds (my fave tennis shoes omg), but the others are highly reputable and have reviews from sources I trust.

At the end of this I must acknowledge that I know not everyone can afford to buy from these expensive, sustainable brands, and often times they do not carry every size. With the current thrifting trend and people buying clothing not their size, it takes options away from people who are that size and have issues finding their size, forcing them to buy from fast fashion companies. Thrift responsibly, just like how you will now, hopefully, shop. Thrift and shop with the planet and others in mind.